Do Division Street Fest

Do Division Street Fest

Shannon and the Clams, Lucky Boys Confusion, Boogarins, Protomartyr, Diet Cig, Wildhoney, Chuck Ragan, RLYR, Christopher Paul Stelling

Friday, June 2nd, 2017 - Sunday, June 4th, 2017

5:00 pm

Do Division Street Fest

Chicago, IL

$5 Suggested Donation

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is all ages

Do Division Street Fest
Do Division Street Fest
Do-Division is the brainchild of the West Town Chicago Chamber of Commerce. It was formed to help people get to know West Town Chicago's West Division Street's diverse offerings from eclectic to romantic, gritty to slick. Just a few miles west of downtown Chicago, West Division Street is conveniently located, easy to get to, and has something for everyone.
Shannon and the Clams
Shannon and the Clams
The American West. America’s America. It was here in three very different worlds that Shannon and the Clams were spawned. From the dark redwood forests of Oregon emerged Cody Blanchard: singer and guitarist. The dusty walnut orchards and vineyards of northern California gave us Shannon Shaw: singer and bassist. Out of the lonely dunes of California’s central coast shambled Nate Mayhem: drummer and keys. These three talented visual artists were drawn separately to Oakland, California and it was there that the Clams began playing house parties and grimy clubs.
The band was forged in the anachronistic remote communities of the west, in some strange mixture of computer show and country fair; their music is some odd alloy of The Last Picture Show and The Decline of Western Civilization. The pioneer spirit of western life is all over this band: pushing into the unknown, blazing their own trail, creating their own destiny, with the accompanying canyon-esque loneliness and untamed joy only truly known by those with the courage to pull up stakes and head off into the big empty sunset.
Gone by the Dawn, the newest Shannon and the Clams album, is their best work to date. The music is complex, the lyrical content is emotionally raw and honest, and the production is the strangest it’s ever been. The album was written as one member was recovering from a serious breakup and another was deep in one. The lyrics reflect it, and the entire album is dripping with sadness, pain, and introspection. Shannon and Cody have not written generic songs about love or the lack of it. Instead they have written about their very own specific heartbreak, mistreatment, and mental trials. The emotion is palpable. On Gone by the Dawn the Clams have DARED TO BE REAL. They’ve exposed their true emotions, which is what’s most moving about the album. People are scared to be so real. Society does not encourage it. Folks remain guarded to protect themselves from being mocked, punished, and becoming outcast . The Clams have opted to forgo the potential tongue-clucking finger-waggers, and have instead had the artistic courage and audacity to splay their pain and struggles out for all to hear. We are lucky to hear them get so damn real.
For Gone by the Dawn, the Oakland trio hooked up with studio wizard and renaissance-man Sonny Smith to record the album at Tiny Telephone Recording in San Francisco. Best known as the driving force behind San Francisco’s beloved Sonny and the Sunsets, Smith uses his refreshing production techniques to create an engaging sonic landscape without compromising the Clams’ signature Lou Christie-meets-The Circle Jerks sound. The Clams have evolved: their skills are sharper, their chops are tighter and weirder and they’ve added new instruments to to the mix. A whole new dimension of the Clams has emerged.
Nowadays, it’s exceedingly rare for a two-and-half minute rock song to have raw emotional power, but with Gone by the Dawn Shannon and the Clams have gifted us an entire album of them.
-Dan Shaw
Lucky Boys Confusion
Lucky Boys Confusion
Lucky Boys Confusion (also known as LBC) is a rock band from the Chicago suburbs in DuPage County. Their music is a mix of rock, punk, ska, and hip hop. The band consists of bassist Jason Schultejann, drummer Ryan Fergus, vocalist Kaustubh (Stubhy) Pandav, guitarist/vocalist Adam Krier, and guitarist Joe Sell. Pandav and Krier write the majority of the band's songs.
Boogarins
Boogarins
Boogarins' Fernando "Dino" Almeida and Benke Ferraz began playing music together as teenagers in the central Brazilian city of Goiânia– recording psychedelic pop in their parents' gardens, filtering their country's rich musical history through a very modern lens. The group's debut LP, As Plantas Que Curam, was a decidedly lo-fi home recording pieced together in isolation, before the pair had recruited a proper rhythm section or played a single gig. By the time the album was released in late 2013 on Other Music Recording Co., Boogarins were already developing a name around Goiânia, and soon after, the now-expanded band was booking regular gigs in São Paulo and across the country. The last two years have seen Boogarins on the road continually – they toured internationally for nearly six months behind their debut, playing American and European festivals from Austin Psych Fest to Burgerama to Primavera, and headlining clubs from London to Paris to Barcelona to New York, and performing alongside many great artists around the world. Back home, where most young groups sing in English like the popular American and British indie bands everyone listens to, Boogarins spoke directly to their Brazilian audience – literally and figuratively – with their Portuguese-sung rock and roll rooted in the traditions of Tropicalismo but nurtured in contemporary global music culture. Without any proper label support or PR in their own homeland, As Plantas Que Curam crossed into broader consciousness in Brazil, topping many fan and critic lists, with the group dubbed 'Best New Artist' in mainstream outlets like Rolling Stone Brazil and on powerhouse GloboTV's annual music awards show, and becoming a major live draw across the country.

In the midst of their 2014 European spring tour, Boogarins made a two-week detour to Jorge Explosion's Estudio Circo Perrotti in Gijón, Spain, where they laid down a bulk of the tracking for what was to become Manual. Recorded to tape, the sessions caught a thrilling live band in peak form after months on the road. The group then took the recordings back to Brazil, and for several months, between regular concert dates around South America, they completed the album in Benke's home studio, adding two new songs and layers of sound and overdubs that tied the new full-band recordings to the feel of their beloved debut. While the resulting new album is undeniably Boogarins, Manual veers into far more complex musical territory, propelled by Dino and Benke's dense, two-guitar interplay and an abundance of deep rhythms. As well, the songwriting here is more personal and socially conscious than their debut, all the while we find the band broadening their collective vision.

In yet another country greatly divided by class, where incredible wealth, conspicuous consumption and global business culture butt up against favelas and brutal poverty, the 2014 Brazil World Cup brought huge and much-needed infrastructure investment with it. Instead of uplifting the local communities, however, entire neighborhoods were pushed aside as huge developments and glassy hotels went up on beaches and in areas long-established as working-class economic and social hubs, with many losing their homes or businesses. Like millions of Brazilians including their own family and friends affected by this snowballing inequality, it deeply resonated with Boogarins, and it's reflected throughout the new record. During album-opener "Avalanche," Dino wishes his lone voice could shake down mountains and crush the politics of greed, singing, "My cries have the strength to knock down all of the buildings/they will not let me see the sun."

Manual has the same dual meanings in Portuguese and English: "to work with your hands" and "an instruction book." With the full title being Manual, ou guia livre de dissolução dos sonhos (Manual, or free guide to the dissolution of dreams), the album should more so be viewed as a sort of diary or dream journal. The artwork, by artist Nei Caetano da Silva (taken from a sketchbook in which he used to draw with his children), perfectly represents the mood of the music: deeply personal, emotional, free-flowing and in the moment, tying together thoughts and dreams. Reflecting on Boogarins' epic journey over the last few years, during album centerpiece "Falsa Folha de Rosto" Dino sings, "viver virou sonhar" (living became dreaming). Yes, Boogarins' new LP does indeed offer a free ride to the dissolution of your dreams.
Protomartyr
Protomartyr
I asked Joe Casey once why he chose to start his first band with a group of guys roughly ten years his junior. His answer was simple: He needed them, needed this, needed Protomartyr. He didn't want to end up singing classic rock covers in a carport or dive bar one night a week. At 35, with no musical background and crippling stage fright, he needed friends who were young and hearty enough to want to write and record and practice and tour and be heard as badly as he did then. He'd just lost his father to an unexpected heart attack, and his heartbroken mother to the beginnings of Alzheimer's shortly thereafter. He'd come to understand, all too intimately, how brutal and finite a life can be. Consider then the urgency with which he joined his bandmates—guitarist Greg Ahee, drummer Alex Leonard, and bassist Scott Davidson, fellow alums of the University of Detroit Jesuit High School and Academy—for the first time, in a basement full of unsuspecting onlookers. Consider the urgency with which they've approached everything since—three albums in three years, each more extraordinary and rewarding than the last. This music is inherently, unassumingly high stakes. I can think of no other band that moves me like they do.

This October marks the release of The Agent Intellect, their third and finest work to date. Named after an ancient philosophical questioning of how the mind operates in relation to the self, it's an elegant and often devastating display of all that makes Protomartyr so vital and singularly visceral an outfit. Over the course of several months, Ahee waded through more than a hundred song fragments until he reached the bottomless melodies of "I Forgive You" and "Clandestine Time", the inky depths of "Pontiac '87" and titanic churn of "Why Does It Shake?" Lyrically, Casey is at his most confident and haunting. He humanizes evil on "The Devil in His Youth," and, amid the charred pop of "Dope Cloud," he reassures us that nothing—not God, not money—can or will prevent our minds from unraveling until we finally fade away. We are no one and nothing, he claims, without our thoughts. It's a theme that echoes through the entirety of the record, but never as beautifully as it does on "Ellen." Named after his mother and written from the perspective of his late father, it's as romantic a song as you're likely to hear this or any year, Casey promising to wait for her on the other side, with the memories she's lost safely in hand.

I remember a story he told me in Detroit. A few months earlier, he'd been driving with his mother as a Protomartyr recording played on the stereo.

"Joe," she asked him. "Who is this?"

"This is us, Mom," he told her. "That's me."

"Oh!" she said, "This is very good."

– David Bevan
Diet Cig
Diet Cig
Diet Cig are here to have fun. They’re here to tear you away from the soul-sucking sanctity of your dumpster-fire life and replace it with pop-blessed punk jams about navigating the impending doom of adulthood when all you want is to have ice cream on your birthday.
Alex Luciano (guitar and vocals) and Noah Bowman (drums) have been playing music together ever since Luciano interrupted the set of Bowman's previous band for a lighter. The New York duo have since released the infectious, 2015 ‘Over Easy’ EP that introduced consistent sing-a-long lyrics with thrashing drums and strums that never held back.

‘Swear I’m Good At This’ is the first full-length from the band and accumulates their tenacity for crafting life-affirming, relatable tales with a gutsy heart at their core. Luciano has the ability to write lyrics that are both vulnerable and badass, perfecting a storm of emotive reflection that creates a vision of a sweaty, pumped-up room screaming these lines in unison. Diet Cig make it okay to be the hot mess that you are.

But there’s also a deeper, more powerful fuck-you among the bangers that see Diet Cig grow into an unstoppable and inspiring force. “I’m not being dramatic, I’ve just fucking had it with the things that you say you think that I should be” spits Luciano on “Link in Bio”; “I am bigger than the outside shell of my body and if you touch it without asking then you’ll be sorry” she yells on “Maid Of The Mist”. It’s the sound of a band doing things on their own terms.

Wrapping up ‘Swear I’m Good At This’ on Halloween 2016, exactly two years after they finished recording ‘Over Easy’ on Halloween 2014, Diet Cig’s first, full-length LP validates the experiences of punks who aren’t always accepted first time around; the punks who throw their deuces up at the dominating bro-dudes and ignite the importance of owning everything that you are.
Wildhoney
Wildhoney
Wildhoney formed in late 2011, aiming to write pop songs with the energy and malcontent of hardcore punk, but without its entrenched masculinity. The five-piece has since become one of the loudest—and sweetest—bands in its hometown of Baltimore.'Sleep Through It' expands on two excellent 7-inches and one cassette EP, drawing influences from '60s girl groups, '80s post punk, indie pop, and shoegaze. Throughout the album, the group's blasts of distortion and use of dense textures are balanced with beautiful pop tunes and chiming guitar work. Sleep Through It was recorded at Beat Babies Studio in Woodstock, Md., with Chris Freeland (Lower Dens, Wye Oak).
Chuck Ragan
Chuck Ragan
Chuck Ragan's bracing new release Till Midnight once again confirms what the iconoclastic singer-songwriter's fans have known all along: that he's a deeply compelling songwriter and an effortlessly charismatic performer, as well as a true believer in music's ability to illuminate and inspire.
Till Midnight's ten typically impassioned new Ragan compositions embody the artist's trademark mix of eloquent lyrical insight and catchy, forceful songcraft. The album's formidable blend of head and heart is reflected on such new tunes as "Something May Catch Fire," "Vagabond," "Non Typical," "Bedroll Lullaby" and "Wake With You," on which Ragan applies his distinctively raspy voice and sharp melodic sensibility to vividly expressive tunes that reflect both his early grounding in traditional American music and his deep affinity for rock n' roll.
"There's a lot of love songs on this one," notes Ragan, whose work has always shown a knack for addressing individual concerns as well as societal ones. "I love to write love songs because it's the most powerful emotion. It's what grounds us to this Earth and makes us want to fight to make the world a better place.
"I always just try to write from the heart and make the music as genuine as I possibly can," he continues. "By doing that, I'm usually writing about whatever's going on in my life. And when you're living your life by wearing your heart on your sleeve, there's not a lot to hide behind."
In a musical life that spans close to three decades, Chuck Ragan has consistently worn his heart on his sleeve, and carved out a musical niche in the process. First with post-hardcore trailblazers Hot Water Music and subsequently on his own, he's built a large and singularly powerful body of work whose honesty, immediacy and warmth have won the loyalty of a fiercely devoted international fan base that's supported him through his various musical incarnations.
Till Midnight benefits from sensitive production by multi-instrumentalist and Blind Melon/AWOL Nation member Christopher Thorn, and backup by Ragan's longstanding combo the Camaraderie—guitarist/pedal steel player Todd Beene, fiddler Jon Gaunt and bassist Joe Ginsberg, plus new drummer David Hidalgo Jr., of Social Distortion and formerly of Suicidal Tendencies, and son of Los Lobos' David Hidalgo—along with Rami Jaffee of Wallflowers/Foo Fighters

fame, Ben Nichols of Lucero, Dave Hause, Jenny O., Chad Price and Jon Snodgrass of Drag the River.
To give Till Midnight an appropriately organic, lived-in feel, Ragan gathered the musicians at his home in Northern California for a week of rehearsal, fishing and preproduction, before road-testing the new material in Europe.
"It was really the first time we all learned and rehearsed the songs as a group and laid everything down together," Ragan explains. "It made a huge difference for everybody to have time to sit and breathe with these songs and let everything develop naturally. There was a feeling that I set out to capture and the guys there were able to help us capture it."
Although its birth cycle may have been different, the honesty and urgency that distinguish Till Midnight have been constants in the musical journey that began in Ragan's early years. After playing in numerous bands in the late '80s and early '90s, Ragan teamed with Chris Wollard, Jason Black and George Rebelo, with whom he relocated from Sarasota, FL to Gainesville and formed Hot Water Music. That band quickly emerged as one of the American punk scene's most distinctive and inventive units, winning a reputation as a riveting live act while releasing such well-received studio albums as Fuel for the Hate Game, Forever and Counting, No Division, A Flight and A Crash, Caution and The New What Next, as well as the live discs Live at the Hardback and Live in Chicago and the compilations Finding the Rhythms, Never Ender and Till the Wheels Fall Off.
Feeling the urge to stretch out creatively, Ragan ventured into a more acoustic approach with the side project Rumbleseat, which released several singles and the album Rumbleseat Is Dead. After Hot Water Music disbanded in 2005, Ragan enthusiastically embraced his new status as solo troubadour, exploring an expanded palette of acoustic and electric textures on the acclaimed albums Feast or Famine, Gold Country and Covering Ground, as well as the stripped- down live set Los Feliz and a series of limited-edition subscription singles released in 2006 and 2007, and later compiled on CD as The Blueprint Sessions.
In 2008, Ragan launched the long-running Revival Tour, a series of collaborative acoustic adventures featuring a diverse assortment of punk, bluegrass and alt-country performers. In addition to Ragan, the Revival Tour, which has visited Britain, Europe, Australia and Scandinavia as well as North America, has featured a broad array of talents, including Anderson Family Bluegrass, Rise Against frontman Tim McIlrath, Craig Finn of the Hold Steady,
Cory Branan, Ben Kweller, Laura Jane Grace, Jay Malinowski of Bedouin Soundclash, Tim Barry, Austin Lucas, Matt Pryor of the Get Up Kids, Jesse Malin, Chris Carrabba, Chris McCaughan, Lucero's Ben Nichols, Dave Hause, Flogging Molly's Matt Hensley and Nathan Maxwell, Joey Cape, Brian Fallon of the Gaslight Anthem, Audra Mae, Emily Barker, Dan Andriano of the Alkaline Trio, along with Jenny O, Kevin Seconds, Frank Turner, Rocky Votolato, Jon Snodgrass, Chad Price and Jenny Owen Youngs.
In 2012—the same year that Ragan reunited with Hot Water Music to record their album Exister—the veteran road warrior released his first book, The Road Most Traveled, a collection of insights and anecdotes on the touring life that serves as both a personal memoir and a helpful how-to handbook. He is currently working on a second volume.
As his book makes clear, and as Till Midnight confirms, Ragan takes his musical mission seriously, drawing inspiration and emotional sustenance from the songwriters and music he surrounds himself with, his family and friends along with the close and loyal relationship with his audience.
"The way I see it," Ragan observes, "we're faced with tons of inspiration every day. Every step of this life has a way of teaching you something, showing you something, opening your ears and your heart to something. I have all these friends out there, and this community that supports me, who believe in what I'm doing and who believe in the power of music and the power of community.
"It's a blessing and a privilege to stand on stage and play music for people," he continues. "I meet so many folks out there, and they're so hospitable and so kind and say such nice things to me about the songs. The support and the energy that I get from them is what makes it possible for me to keep doing this. And when I'm there and in that moment, it's important to me to give it back to them as strongly as they're giving it to me."
RLYR
RLYR
Feat - Trevor de Brauw (Pelican, Chord, etc.)
Steven Hess (Locrian, Pan American, Anjou, etc.)
Colin DeKuiper (Bloodiest, ex-Russian Circles)
Venue Information:
Do Division Street Fest
2000 W. Division St.
Chicago, IL